Friday, April 17, 2009

Geographical Regions of the Peru Lima East Mission

Peru has eight natural (or geographical) regions, and all eight regions are represented in the Peru Lima East Mission. Below you can see Scott's photo of each region, except the low jungle.

Chala region is the coastal area along the Pacific Ocean. It is subtropical dry and tropical savana. Lima (where we lived for 4 months) is in the Chala region:

Yungas region has an altitude of 1600 to 5000 feet above sea level. It includes the forest along the eastern slopes of the Andes mountains, with an extremely diverse climate, flora, and fauna. We travel through this region during our trips from Lima to Tarma:

Quechua region, altitude 7500 to 11,500 feet, includes big valleys divided by rivers. The second largest city in our mission, Huancayo, is in this region. We live in Tarma, which is also part of this region:


Suni region, 11,500 to 13,500 feet, is dry and cold. Cities in our mission in this region and that we have visited, include La Oroya (where we go every Saturday), Huancavelica, San Pedro de Cajas, and others. This picture shows the Suni region between Tarma and La Oroya:


Puna region, 10,500 feet to 14,800 feet, includes the altiplanos or pampas (vast high plains), where puna grass grows. The two cities in our mission in the Puna region are Cerro de Pasco and Junín (where we go every Saturday). This picture shows the Puna region just outside Junín:


Junca region includes the jagged, snow-covered mountains above 13,500 feet. This picture was taken near Ticlio, the mountain pass (at 15,800 feet) that we travel through going from Lima to Tarma:


Rupa region, 1,600 to 2,300 feet, is the high jungle areas on the eastern side of the Andes Mountains. The city of La Merced in our mission (and where we attended a Multi-zone Conference) is included in the Rupa region:


Omagua region is the low (below 1300 feet) jungle. We haven't been there yet, so we don't have pictures, but the town of Satipo in our mission is located in the Omagua region.

We have an extremely geographically diverse mission, with probably the biggest elevation changes of any mission in the world.

12 comments:

Andrea said...

How beautiful! I would love to see each of those places.

Sharon and Lin said...

Never dreamed that Peru was so vast and varied. Those pictures are magnificant! And we're getting rather excited to see a few of those places in person:-)

PS Are you making a list of what you want us to bring too you?

Russ said...

What a wonderful country. I wish I was visiting you guys like Sharon and Lin.

Tyler said...

Is the Lima temple in the Lima East Mission?

Scott and Beverly said...

Tyler, yes, the Lima Temple is within the boundaries of the Peru Lima East Mission--on the east side of Lima.

The Riggs Family said...

Pres. Groberg, I am Tina Riggs, Elder Colton Riggs's mother, he is there at the MTC with you, could you e-mail me. I need to visit with you, please.
tlriggs5@hotmail.com
Sorry to comment on your blog, didn't know how to get ahold of you.
Love all your pictures, there beautiful.

Anonymous said...

My Son just opened his mission papers today and we are excited to say he is going to Peru, Lima East Mission. Thank you for posting this website so we have an idea of what he can expect. He is excited and leaves on his mission on the 24th of February.

Anonymous said...

My Son just opened his mission papers today and we are excited to say he is going to Peru, Lima East Mission. Thank you for posting this website so we have an idea of what he can expect. He is excited and leaves on his mission on the 24th of February.

Los Riggs said...

Our Grandson just opened his call today to the Peru Lima East mission. He reports to the MTC April 7.

We recently returned from a mission to Santiago Chile.

Rich said...

Thanks for this web site. Our son opened his call on Thanksgiving and is going to serve in the Peru, Lima East mission. He reports April 7th, 2009. Thanks again for this site it has been nice to get a feel for where he is going.

gcahn2 said...

I am very interested in how they use the coca leaf down there. Have you run into any of this? What are your impressions of their use of the coca leaf. I hypothesize that their thousands of years of experience with the leaf trumps our experience with concentrating and refining a single constituent chemical from this complex living organism.You can email me if you like. I would like to communicate with you. gcahn2@roadrunner.com

gcahn2 said...

I also think we could benefit medicaly from the coca leaf. I think we could treat obesity and perhaps diabetes and other conditions with the leaf. I know it is very hard to get over our prejudged notions about a drug which has caused so much devistation in the U.S., but I think the local users in the Andes have much to teach us about its use.